Expanded Catalogue 1 – All items at a glance

editor | | Sunday, June 28th, 2009

Network NSW Inc.
Educational Projects Resource Library
Expanded Catalogue 1

You will note that there are two versions of the Expanded Catalogue. The “Expanded Catalogue 1” summarises what each course contains. You may need to use this information to print a hard copy. There are approximately 18 pages of text, should you choose to print the whole catalogue. As this section is quite long, you are invited to check Expanded Catalogue 2 for easy access to view the same information by clicking on to the headings.

New Resources Added

Bob the Builder

With just over 55 slides, Anne Gribble takes us from 40,000 years ago to the modern day showing buildings that have been constructed, many of which have survived the ravages of centuries. This resource may be downloaded from Miscellaneous Course in Catalogue 2. Enjoy her presentation.

Hatchesput

Hatchesput is a resource contributed by Michael Shannon of Shellharbour U3A. Michael describes her as “a model of feminine mystique, power and political acumen”. This thirty minute presentation will tell more about Hatchesput, the first great woman in history, in the same company as Catherine the Great and Elizabeth 1st. It can be downloaded from International Biographies.

16th Century Art

16th Century Art by Carol Armstrong of Forster/Tuncurry U3A is a most comprehensive resource which includes art information – especially painting – leading up to the 16th Century. The document contains 47 pages and is supported by 133 slides, the audience will remain glued to their seats for two hours and enjoy every minute.

Behind Matilda’s Skirts

This entertaining session by Anne Gribble from Griffith is a short unauthorised history of Australia told with humour and, as Anne says containing information you may not have found in your 6th class history books. Click here to view details.

The History of the English Alphabet

This resource from Ern Hollebone of Manning Valley U3A contains

  • Notes to the presenter,
  • Alphabet Booklet,
  • Teaching Notes and a
  • Power Point presentation “The English Alphabet”

You will be taken on a journey from the times of the Phoenicians right up to modern days, looking at the history, features and idiosyncrasies of the alphabet as we know it.

Cleopatra’s Nose

This wonderful resource from John Miller of Goulburn Mulwaree provides a set of 27 handouts for discussion/study by U3As. It’s based on the style of “What if” and includes topics such as ; Edward VIII’s abdication, Captain Cook’s arrival in Botany Bay, Darwin and Evolution and Penicillin. This item is too big to download and must be ordered from the Library Manager

Richard III – The King in the Carpark from Mel Davies

The exhumation of Richard III of England from his burial place within the former Greyfriars Friary Church in the city of Leicester, England, took place in September 2012. Two PowerPoints and three documents by Mel Davies of Lake Macquarie U3A, tell the story of Richard III and his exhumation.

The Six Wives of Henry VIII – Booklet

At the 2014 Network Conference, Ern Hollebone explained to those present at the Resource Library workshop how he reorganized the Six Wives of Henry VIII and created a booklet which he provided to the participants at Manning Valley U3A – at a small cost. He used the information provided on the website plus some more. You can download the pdf from Expanded Catalogue 2 under the heading of The Six Wives of Henry VIII.

History

An Introduction to the Celts

This course was developed and presented as a lecture over five 1½ hour sessions with 30 minutes set aside each session for questions and discussion. However the material can be used in a variety of ways; “one-offs”, short courses, discussion groups, as a stimulus for group work and independent research. Course leaders should feel free to adapt this material as needed. Suggestions about how this might be done are included.

  • First known Celtic societies – Urnfield and La Tene
  • The Celts as a power in Europe
  • The Celts, Hannibal and Rome
  • The Celts and Julius Caesar
  • The Celts in Britain
  • Celtic law
  • Celtic mythology – and its contribution to the legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. (The Resource Library offers a separate course on The Arthurian Legend. See the catalogue under Myths and Legends.)
  • The Druids and Celtic religion
  • The role of women in ancient Celtic society
  • Boadicea (Boudicca), Queen of the Iceni
  • Our Celtic heritage

An Introduction to the Celts

Nine power point programs have been prepared by Rita Richards of Tuggerah Lakes U3A

  • Celts in Europe
  • Celtic Expansion
  • Celtic Society and Art
  • Celtic Rituals
  • Celts – Ba and Warriors
  • Celts in Ireland
  • Celts in Wales
  • Celts and Picts
  • Celts- Ancient Sites

Three video presentations – Australian Celtic Country; Mousa Broch Castell Henllys; Skelling Michael.

South African History to 1900

  • Early inhabitants
  • Arrival of the Europeans – Dutch and East India Companies
  • The Great Trek and the Trekboers
  • Zulus and the Battle of Blood River
  • Discovery of diamonds and gold
  • British consolidation
  • The Boer Wars

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

The Six Wives of Henry VIII

Henry VIII was just short of 18 years old when he was crowned King and soon thereafter took his first bride. It was the beginning of the marital history for which he is best remembered.

Course Outline:

  • Background – the establishment of a Tudor dynasty
  • Katherine of Aragon
  • Anne Boleyn
  • Jane Seymour
  • Anne of Cleves
  • Catherine Howard
  • Katherine Parr
  • The Legacy of Henry and his wives

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

The Six Wives of Henry VIII – Booklet

At the 2014 Network Conference, Ern Hollebone explained to those present at the Resource Library workshop how he reorganized the Six Wives of Henry VIII and created a booklet which he provided to the participants at Manning Valley U3A – at a small cost. He used the information provided on the website plus some more. You can download the pdf from Expanded Catalogue 2 under the heading of The Six Wives of Henry VIII.

Victorian Britain

There are five comprehensive items in this excellent resource which has been donated to the Resource Library by Gordon Holding from Tamworth U3A. As each item is very large in content, only one could be uploaded – to whet your appetite.

There are PowerPoint slides and notes for each session, however you will need to read each document and pencil in where each slide change occurs. The Library Manager will send you all the material; click here to send her an e-mail.

Introduction to Victorian Britain – In the early 19th century the Monarchy was unpopular, seen as German spongers and was widely assumed to be on the way out. Victoria was to rescue it with a little help from jingoism and the British Empire. At first she was quite popular but then several scandals undermined this. However, by the 1850’s she and her husband seemed to symbolise happy moral family life.

Victorian Britain Cities – Victorian Britain faced a unique challenge – how to live in an industrialised and urbanised world. Cities grew rapidly during the 19th century in response to industrialisation, people driven off the land by landlords and a rising population.

Victorian Britain Industry – In the Victorian Era the Industrial Revolution continued apace. By the 1850’s

  • Britain had become the world’s richest country.
  • Britain’s banks had more money on deposit than the rest of the world combined.
  • Britain had 1.6% of world pop. 20% world industrial output , 33% of world trade.

Victorian Britain Crime and Punishment – The pictures of Victorian crime that we get from Dickens, and later Sherlock Holmes and the Jack the Ripper case, can lead us to think that the Victorian era was a high crime period.

Historians such as David Jones have carefully analysed the statistics of reported crime and court cases in Georgian and Victorian times to try to assess the extent of crime then. They have also looked at the criminal statistics produced by the London Metropolitan Police which kept careful records from the 1830’s.

Victorian World Views – The Ideas first developed in the Victorian Period still form the backdrop to our political views today.

Click here to see the course details.

Joan of Arc

Her voices and visions have played many tricks with her reputation. Find out more about the Maid of Orleans.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Hannibal

The genius and power of Carthage, he died as he had lived, defiant, unconquered and unyielding.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

A look at each of the traditional Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

  • Hanging Gardens of Babylon
  • Statue of Zeus at Olympia
  • Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
  • Mausoleum of Maussollos at Halicarnassus
  • Colossus of Rhodes
  • Lighthouse of Alexandria
  • Great Pyramid of Giza

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Australian History – 19th century: “The Golden Age” – 1851-1871

This course deals with two events that were to change a nation – the gold rushes of the !850’s and 1860’s and the Eureka Stockade.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Australian History – 19th century: Bushrangers

Bushranging was a way of life for some and spanned nearly 100 years. This course looks at its better-known exponents, from the first convict bushrangers active from 1790 to the 1860s, through the outlawed bushrangers of the 1860s and 1870s and on to the exploits of the Kelly Gang in the 1880s

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Short biographies of Australian Governors, pre-Federation (commencing with Arthur Phillip)

These biographies of Governors pre-federation are very comprehensive. As there is so much information, you are advised to run them as a series of sessions. They are written as documents and lend themselves to the creation of Power points. Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Short biographies of Australian Premiers, pre-Federation

These biographies of Premiers pre-federation are very comprehensive. As there is so much information, you are advised to run them as a series of sessions. They are written as documents and lend themselves to the creation of Power points. Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

C.E. Bean and the ANZAC Legend

A revised biography of C.E.W. Bean, the Australian journalist, war correspondent and historian who was instrumental in the establishment of the Australian War Memorial and the promotion of the ANZAC legend. (now a Ppt presentation)

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Ben Boyd

Controversial 19th century entrepreneur who ran foul of a colonial “establishment’, especially in the form of aristocratic John Macarthur, who saw Boyd as a lower middle-class upstart threatening to out-achieve and outshine him. For over 160 years Boyd has been regarded as what we would call a corporate crook and air-brushed from history. However, prominent Australian historian Geoffrey Blainey has re-instated him, describing him as a buccaneer.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Elizabeth Macarthur

Australia is recognised as producing the world’s highest quality woolen fibre – Australian merino wool. All of this has been achieved in just over 200 years and began with the hard work of John and Elizabeth Macarthur. However, while history books refer to John as “the father of the Australian wool industry”.there are some who would say that the credit should go to Elizabeth.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Behind Matilda’s Skirts

This entertaining session by Anne Gribble from Griffith is a short unauthorised history of Australia told with humour and, as Anne says containing information you may not have found in your 6th class history books. Please contact the Library Manager to receive the Ppt and document.

Language and Literature

The History of the English Alphabet

This resource from Ern Hollebone of Manning Valley U3A contains

  • Notes to the presenter,
  • Alphabet Booklet,
  • Teaching Notes and a
  • Power Point presentation “The English Alphabet”

You will be taken on a journey from the times of the Phoenicians right up to modern days, looking at the history, features and idiosyncrasies of the alphabet as we know it.

The Nature of Language

Outlines and Synopses for Language Series

The following Power Point programs have been written by Robert Loveday who may be contacted at robjloveday@hotmail.com or by phone on (07) 4128-9308.

You are strongly advised to contact Rob Loveday direct to access his material.

STOP PRESS

Rob has advised that this resource now has an updated, much expanded “Outlines and Synopses” for all the modules. As well as the 22 modules included here there are now 33 more, making a total of 55 altogether.

General Information: All the modules in this series contain many exercises and tasks for the class to do. Suggested answers are either in the speaker notes, or on the slides themselves. Please read “Instructions for Use” to maximise the use of these exercises/tasks.

Although most modules focus mainly on the English language, there are many comparative studies and forays into other languages.

There is also much historical information on earlier forms of English, and the evolution of English.

The “Nature of Language” series should be worked through from part 1 to subsequent parts. It may be possible to do parts 4B, 5B, and 5C in isolation, but greater appreciation will be obtained if the series is undertaken in number order.

If you have any queries, or need assistance regarding the presentation or content, please don’t hesitate to contact me on email: robjloveday@hotmail.com
or telephone (07) 41289308 (preferably before noon).

1. History of English (150 slides)
This section takes us from the Celts to Modern English (Shakespeare to Standardised English)

2. Humour – Laugh at English (80 slides)
This module explores how English is used at various levels to create humour.

3. English in Society – Language at Work (350 slides)
This module investigates English at work in everyday society.

4. English around the World (350 slides)
This module tours the world looking into various varieties and dialects of English.

5. Nature of Language – Part 1 (180 slides)
Linguistic Knowledge: What it means to “know” a language

6. Nature of Language – Part 2 – Phonetics (170 slides)
Among other things, this module looks at the place and manner of articulation of all the sounds that make up our words

7. Nature of Language – Part 3 – Phonology (340 slides)
Phonology explores how the individual sounds discovered in phonetics combine. You should do “Nature of Language – Part 2 – Phonetics” before this module.

8. Nature of Language – Part 4A – Morphology (380 slides)
Morphology deals with the syllable and word level of language.

9. Nature of Language – Part 4B – Word Coinage (approx. 350 slides)
Now that the class has grasped the concept of morphemes in part 4A, this module reveals the various methods languages have for creating new words.

10. Nature of Language – Part 4C – Morphology – pronunciation and rules (106 slides)
This module finishes of the study of morphology with a look at the rules that underlie the joining together of segments into words.

11. Nature of Language – Part 5A – Syntax (330 slides)
The series on syntax (Nature of language – parts 5A, 5B, 5C & 5D) contain much of what we called “grammar” when we went to school.
This module (part 5A) explores how words come together to form phrases, clauses, and sentences

12. Nature of Language – Part 5B – Syntax – Word classes part 1 – nouns and verbs (500 slides)
Before continuing with syntax, it is necessary to get a firm grounding in the word classes, previously called “parts of speech”. This module covers nouns and verbs.

13. Nature of Language – Part 5C – Syntax – Word classes part 2 – adj. adv. etc. (560 slides)
This module completes the investigation of word classes begun in “Nature of Language – part 5B

14. Nature of Language – Part 5D – Syntax continued (440 slides)
Explores levels of sentence structure, looking particularly at the clause and phrase level. The interplay between syntax and stylistic issues in speech, writing and the media are also touched on in this module.

15. Nature of Language – Part 6A – Semantics (500 slides)
This is the first of the modules covering various aspects of semantics – the meanings of words, sentences, and utterances in everyday conversation.

16. Nature of Language – Part 6B – Semantics (460 slides)
This module explores some special semantic relationships between words – Synonyms, euphemisms, antonyms, homonyms, homographs, homophones, polysemy.

17. Nature of Language – Part 6C – Semantics (approx. 700 slides)
This module begins by looking at some more special semantic relations – viz. hyponymy & hypernyms; hierarchies; series; meronym & holonym; metonym.

18. Nature of Language – Part 6D – Semantic change (600 slides)
This module focuses on how the meanings of words have changed over time.

19. Nature of Language – Part 7A – Discourse Part 1 (Approx. 400 slides)
Discourse refers to the slices of language we encounter everyday – those segments of language larger than the sentence level – that is, speech and written texts.

20. Nature of Language – Part 7B – Discourse Part 2 – Styles and Varieties (Approx. 470 slides)
In this module, we begin by first contrasting written English with spoken English, including situations where we mix features of both.

21. Brainteasers (seven modules ranging from 20 to over 100 slides each)
These modules are a compilation of various styles and types of exercises. They should be both mentally stimulating and potentially fun. Most of the items have been taken from various IQ tests

22. Etymology Mondegreen Synonyms Treacle (Created by Geoff Baker, U3A Hervey Bay) (4 modules ranging from 10 to 50 slides each)
These four short modules explores the etymology of a few dozen English words with interesting histories.

All available as PowerPoint Programs.

History of the English Language

A panoramic view of the social, economic and historical influences which have shaped and continue to shape the English language.

This course was developed and presented as a lecture over six 1½ hour sessions with 30 minutes set aside each session for questions and discussion. However the material can be used in a variety of ways; “one-offs”, short courses, discussion groups, as a stimulus for group work and independent research. Course leaders should feel free to adapt this material as needed. Suggestions about how this might be done are included.

Course Outline:

  • What is language?
  • Where did the English language come from?
  • The Indo European family of languages.
  • Celtic influence.
  • Latin influence.
  • Anglo-Saxon influence.
  • Scandinavian influence.
  • French influence.
  • The Renaissance: an intellectual revolution.
  • World Expansion: new worlds to conquer – effect on vocabulary.
  • 17th – 18th centuries: attempts to standardise the language – grammar, spelling, dictionaries.
  • 19th century onwards: growth of science and technology – coining words for the modern world.
  • Where to from here for the English language?

Supplementary:

  1. English Spelling – why is it so?
  2. Slang – its uses and abuses.
  3. Some old terms, many of which are no longer used.

Australian literature in the 19th century

This course provides an overview of the growth of Australian literature from the arrival of the First Fleet to the end of the 19th century. Writers dealt with are:

  • Watkin Tench
  • John White
  • Anna Maria Bunn
  • Henry Savery
  • James Tucker
  • Annabell Boswell
  • Charles Harpur
  • Adam Lindsay Gordon
  • Henry Kendall
  • Marcus Clarke
  • Rolf Boldrewood
  • Miles Franklin
  • Barbara Baynton
  • Joseph Furphy
  • Andrew Barton Paterson
  • Henry Lawson
  • Significant influences
  • Growth of newspapers
  • The Bulletin magazine

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

C.J. Dennis and the Sentimental Bloke

Dennis has been called “the Robert Burns of Australia”. In this course we will meet The Bloke and ”is Doreen – characters who have become part of our literary tradition. But did you know he also wrote for children? If you’ve not yet met the Glugs of Gosh or the Triantiwontigongolope, here’s your chance.

Available in Power Point and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Geoffrey Chaucer: his life, work and times

Geoffrey Chaucer was what we would today call multi-skilled – an English author, poet, philosopher, bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat, best known as the author of The Canterbury Tales. This course provides a brief account of Chaucer’s own life, examines the turbulent society in which he lived and takes a look at two of his most vividly drawn characters from the Tales – The Wife of Bath and The Pardoner.

Available in Power Point and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Shakespearean Tragedy

Critical analysis of the major tragedies: (separate courses)

  • Macbeth
  • King Lear
  • Othello, the Moor of Venice
  • Hamlet, the Prince of Denmark

Each includes an outline of the nature of both Classical Greek and Shakespearean dramatic tragedy and a plot outline of the play for use as a handout.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Shakespeare’s Shylock: villain or victim

Shakespeare’s play The Merchant of Venice, gives us one of his most interesting characters, Shylock, the Jew. His encounter with the witty Portia in the courtroom scene is dramatic conflict at its best, during which Shakespeare invites us, his audience, to ponder the issues raised in the play and to decide just where our sympathy lies. Is Shylock villain or victim?

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Shakespeare and the Modern World

The aim of this course is to have participants come to see Shakespeare’s plays as relevant to us today. It poses a question – how believable do we find the central characters in Macbeth, Hamlet and King Lear and to what degree are the issues raised in these plays relevant to us in the 21st century? The emphasis is on discussion and suggested “trigger questions” are provided. However course leaders should feel free to adapt the course as needed. Suggestions as to how this might be done and plot summaries for use as handouts are included.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Explorers

Portuguese Explorers in the Age of Discovery

During the 15th and 16th centuries Portugal (together with Spain) pioneered the European discovery of sea routes that were the first step in interaction between all the world’s continents – a kind of early “globalisation”?

This course traces the journeys of Bartholemew Diaz, Ferdinand Magellan and Vasco da Gama, acknowledges the role played by Henry the Navigator, whose vision made it all possible and concludes by examining the feasibility of the theory that the Portuguese, not Captain Cook, discovered Australia.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

The History of Australian Exploration – a chronological summary

A comprehensive list of recorded explorations from 1503 to 1888. This makes interesting and thought-provoking reading.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Australian explorers

  • George Bass: explored the east coast of Australia and together with Matthew Flinders proved that Tasmania was an island.
  • Robert Burke and William Wills: Led the first European expedition to cross the continent of Australia from south to north..
  • Nicholas Baudin; French explorer, cartographer, naturalist and hydrographer. He led a French expedition to map the coast of Australia and met Matthew Flinders, also engaged in charting the coastline, in Encounter Bay.
  • Gregory Blaxland: Led the first known European expedition across the area of the Great Dividing Range known as the Blue Mountains, along with William Lawson and William Charles Wentworth, on a journey which would open up the inland of the continent.
  • Edward Eyre: Together with his aboriginal friend Wylie, Eyre was the first European to cross southern Australia from east to west, travelling across the Nullarbor Plain from Adelaide to Albany
  • Matthew Flinders: A supremely talented navigator, hydrographer and scientist, he circumnavigated and named Australia.
  • Ludwig Leichhardt: Most famous for his exploration of northern and central Australia. His disappearance while on expedition, although investigated by many, remains a mystery.
  • John McDouall Stuart:In 1862, Stuart succeeded in crossing Australia from south to north, passing through the centre of the continent, thus opening up an all-year round route which was later followed by the Overland Telegraph.
  • Abel Tasman: Led the first known European expedition to reach Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania). He also mapped substantial portions of Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands.
  • Charles Sturt: While searching to determine if there was an “inland sea he traced several of the westward-flowing rivers, establishing that they all merged into the mighty Murray.

Each of these explorers can be downloaded separately from Expanded Catalogue 2

George Hubert Wilkins – an unsung hero of Antarctic Exploration

An account of the exploits of George Hubert Wilkins -Australian Polar explorer as well as naturalist, geographer, climatologist, aviator, author, war correspondent, balloonist, submariner and navigator. Yet he is relatively unknown in his own country. Why?

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

The “Heroic Age” of Antarctic Exploration

The “Heroic Age” is best defined by the race to the South Pole. While they were not by any means the only adventurers/explorers during the period; four names shine brightly – Douglas Mawson; Robert Scott; Ernest Shackleton and Roald Amundsen. Their stories are told here.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Antarctica – A tour in 1995

Early in 1995 Robyn and Bob Bray of Forster/Tuncurry U3A took the trip of a lifetime – a voyage to Antarctica. “Antarctica,” Robyn writes, “exhilarates and compels, humbles and intimidates; not just day to day but moment to moment. It is the highest, windiest, coldest, driest and most mesmerizing continent on our earth. The images are breathtaking with natural sculptures of icebergs in all shades of blue”. Robyn shares her experience with us in this major power point presentation.

Available in PowerPoint.

International Biographies

Short biographies. Can be downloaded separately or they are available in sets of 5 from the Library Manager.

  • Adaams, Jane – Social worker – recipient of the Nobel Prize
  • Austen Jane – English novelist (available in PowerPoint)
  • Bonaparte Napoleon – General and Emperor of France (available in PowerPoint)
  • Boulanger, Nadia – composer, conductor and Professor of music
  • Byron George Gordon Lord – Romantic poet (available in PowerPoint)
  • Carroll, Lewis – author (available in power point)
  • Cezanne, Paul – French post-impressionist painter
  • Curie, Marie – scientist – discoverer of radium
  • Earhart, Amelia – Aviatrix
  • Gandhi, Mahatma – considered the father of Indian independence
  • Gilbert and Sullivan – playwrights of musicals.
  • Hannibal – Rome’s worst njghtmare.
  • Inman. John – actor; Mr Humphries of Are You Being Served(available in PowerPoint)
  • Jerome, Jenny – socialite; mother of Winston Churchill
  • Joan of Arc – Maid of Orleans
  • Johnson, Amy – first woman to fly around the world
  • Khayyam, Omar – ancient Persian poet
  • Lagerloff, Sonia – awarded a Nobel Prize for literature
  • Lowry, Lawrence – painter of the stylistic “matchstick men”
  • Mansfield, Katherine – New Zealand writer of short stories
  • Marconi, Guglielmo – the inventor of radio (available in PowerPoint)
  • Millar, Gertie – musical comedy singer actress
  • Nightingale, Florence – nurse and statistician in the Crimean War (available in PowerPoint)
  • Renoir, Pierre – French impressionist painter
  • Richard III 1452 to 1485 – The King in the carpark
  • Richardson, Ian – leading Shakespearean actor
  • Schwarzkopf, Elisabeth – opera singer and recitalist
  • Shaw, George Bernard – English playwright
  • Shearer, Moira – ballet dancer and actress
  • Sheldon, Sidney – Broadway playwright and screenwriter
  • Von Suttnor, Bertha – pacifist and first woman to win a Nobel Prize
  • Vyroubova,Nina – ballerina with the Paris Opera Ballet
  • Wilde, Oscar – playwright, short stories; available in power point

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Richard III – The King in the Carpark from Mel Davies

The exhumation of Richard III of England from his burial place within the former Greyfriars Friary Church in the city of Leicester, England, took place in September 2012. Two PowerPoints and three documents by Mel Davies of Lake Macquarie U3A, tell the story of Richard III and his exhumation.

Famous Australians

Short biographies. Can be downloaded separately or they are available in sets of 5 from the Library Manager.

  • Anderson, Dame Judith – award-winning Australian actress
  • Bean, C.E – and the ANZAC legend
  • Bates, Daisy – anthropologist and social worker
  • Boyd, Ben – controversial 19th century entrepreneur. (See also Australian History)
  • Blackburn, Elizabeth – microbiologist and Nobel Prize winner
  • Bligh, William – the true story of the Mutiny on the Bounty.
  • Bronhill, June – opera singer – soprano
  • Dennis, C.J – Australian poet
  • Dunlop, Edward(“Weary”) – doctor, war hero and humanitarian (available in PowerPoint)
  • Franklin, Milesauthor of novel My Brilliant Career
  • Fraser, Dawn – Olympic swimmer
  • Fullwood, Albert Henry – Australian painter and illustrator
  • Garimara, Doris (“Ninji”) – indigenous writer: Follow the Rabbit Proof Fence (available in PowerPoint)
  • Hollows, Dr Fred – eye surgeon and humanitarian
  • Lindsay, Norman – legendary artist – highly controversial in his time
  • Lyons, Joseph and Enid – husband and wife “political team”
  • Macarthur, Elizabeth – pioneer of the sheep industry. (See also Australian History)
  • McCaughey, Sir Samuel – pioneer, politician and philanthropist
  • Macquarie, Lachlan – sometimes regarded as The Father of modern Australia” (available in PowerPoint)
  • Macfarlane-Burnett, Sir Frank – a leader of the scientific community
  • Melba, Dame Nellie – legendary Australian opera soprano
  • Namitjira, Albert – indigenous artist
  • Phar Lap – iconic racehorse
  • Murdochs, The – builders of a media empire
  • Richardson, Henry Handel – author of The Fortunes of Richard Mahony
  • Truganini – Tasmanian aborigine – one of the last of her tribe
  • Walker, Kath – indigenous poet
  • Wentworths,The – a colonial dynasty (available in PowerPoint).
  • Women who defied the law. – Caroline Chisholm and Bea Miles (available in PowerPoint).
  • Wood, Dr Fiona – surgeon and medical researcher (available in PowerPoint)
  • Wright, Judith – Australian poet, conservationist and campaigner for Aboriginal rights

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Myths and Legends

The Arthurian Legend

Arthurian legend developed over some 1,500 years and the tales of King Arthur and his band of knights have become part of our culture. This course looks at the development of the legend and its main features.

The content lends itself to a wide variety of uses and methods of presentation such as “one-offs”, short courses and discussion groups and can serve as a stimulus for group work and independent research Course leaders should feel free to adapt this material as needed. Suggestions as to how this might be done are included.

Course outline:

  • Celtic influences on the Arthurian legend.
  • Emergence of the legend as we know it today: Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyse, Sir Thomas Malory and his “Morte D’Arthur”
  • Role of Merlin
  • Was there a “real”, an “historical” Arthur?
  • The legendary Arthur
  • The “Round Table” – Chivalry and Fellowship at Camelot
  • The Quest for the Holy Grail
  • The fatal triangle: Lancelot, Guinevere and Arthur
  • Arthur’s death and the end of Camelot
  • The legend in the modern world: The Order of the Garter, established in 1384 and still operative today; the 19th century “romantic” revival of interest in the legend and its continued reflection in the 20th and 21st centuries in art, music and film

Several Arthurian “tales” are provided as appendices.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Five mysteries of the Sea

Five maritime mysteries which have become part of universal folklore: the lost city of Atlantis, the Flying Dutchman, the abandoned Marie Celeste, disappearances within the Bermuda Triangle and the fearsome Kraken.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

The Santa Claus Legend

A look at the various legends, beliefs and influences which have led to the development of Santa Claus as we know him today and the Christmas traditions with which he is associated.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Things that go bump in the night

Big-Foot; Yeti; Yerren; the Bunyip; Werewolves and Vampires, the Loch Ness monster: fact or fiction? It’s for you to decide.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Miscellaneous Courses

Beads

This is a fascinating story about beads which spans the globe, showing their presence in all cultures and at all times throughout history. The resource, written as a Powerpoint and document by Nita Millard from Forster/Tuncurry U3A takes us on that journey.

Bob the Builder

With just over 55 slides, Anne Gribble takes us from 40,000 years ago to the modern day showing buildings that have been constructed, many of which have survived the ravages of centuries. This resource may be downloaded from Miscellaneous Course in Catalogue 2. Enjoy her presentation.

Cultural Identity

This is an excellent PowerPoint Presentation with supporting notes about Australia’s cultural identity. It may be used to provide spring boards of ideas for U3A courses/presentations. Thanks to Des Davis of Port Macquarie.

Cleopatra’s Nose

This wonderful resource from John Miller of Goulburn Mulwaree provides a set of 27 handouts for discussion/study by U3As. It’s based on the style of “What if” and includes topics such as ; Edward VIII’s abdication, Captain Cook’s arrival in Botany Bay, Darwin and Evolution and Penicillin.

Set of four course guidelines

Papers presented to a U3A-ACT Conference in 2007 outlining methods of presentation and other strategies employed when delivering the following courses.

  • Convening a history course
  • An approach to presenting a course in classical music
  • Managing a weekly book group
  • Presenting Chaucer: the road to Canterbury.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Murray-Darling Basin

Almost the whole of inland South-Eastern Australia is part of the Murray-Darling Basin. It covers an area 1,450 kilometres long and 1,000 kilometres wide and consists largely of plains rising to the Great Dividing Range on its Eastern and Southern rim.

So begins this series of presentations about the Murray-Darling Basin by Pam McGlynn from Tuggerah Lakes U3A. Using PowerPoint presentations and excellent Quicktime audios and movies Pam has provided a comprehensive resource telling the history, the effect that water use has had on the environment, water trading and funding and a host of other concerns.

Available in PowerPoint.

Setting up and conducting a Discussion Group – the “Friday Forum”

The highly successful “Friday Forum” format, developed by Shirley Beaver of Northern Rivers (Lismore) U3A, has been described by one participant as “not only an intellectual exercise, and one that keeps us alert, in touch and open-minded but also a valuable social event”. These notes explain the rationale on which it is based and provide a step-by-step guide to conducting the sessions.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Setting up and conducting “Coffee and Chat”

Guidelines for establishing an informal “drop in” activity a service to members which also has some valuable “spinoffs” not the least of which is helping identify potential group leaders!

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Setting up a Men’s Shed

So you’d like to set up a Men’s Shed and want to know where to start, or perhaps you’d like to chat with others who are already operating one? Here you are referred to the experts. Contact details are provided.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Setting up and conducting a personal history group

A step-by-step guide to conducting a personal history group. A set of “memory triggers” are included.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Guidelines for Setting up and Conducting a Reading Group or Book Club

  • Setting up
    • how will members be recruited?
    • How many members should the group have?
    • Where will it meet and when?
  • The first meeting
    • some suggested “ice breakers” to get people interacting and talking.
  • What kind of books will the group read?
    • How will they be chosen?
  • Guidelines for discussion of a book, including “trigger questions”.
  • Using your local library.
  • Contact details for hire of multiple copies of a title.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Speaker’s Kit

A kit to assist with spreading the word about U3A by delivering addresses to other non-for-profit organisations.

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Your Guide to Public Relations – handbook

Welcome to the world of Publicity. If it’s your first landing on this alien planet it can be a pretty scary place, inhabited as it is by all sorts of strange creatures and packed full of traps and pitfalls for the unwary.

The good news is that you’re no longer on your own.

Each of us has had to face the daunting task of trying to work out exactly what it is that a Publicity Officer does, and how best to do it.

Every area poses its own unique challenges and opportunities and yet there are basic similarities and common resources that we can all access.

Your U3A is part of the NSW Network; and it is as a Network that we can work together to assist each other in improving our Marketing skills.

I hope that this Handbook will be both inspirational and useful to all those who choose to “take on” the role of Publicity Officer.

Col Jones Network NSW Public Relations Officer

Can be downloaded from the Network Website.

Comparative Religion

Notes on the following world religions: available as a set or individually.

  • Buddhism
  • Christianity
  • Hinduism
  • Islam
  • Judaism
  • Zoroastrrianism
  • Babi and Baha’i

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Stories in Sandstone

This session provided by Margaret Guider of Forter-Tuncurry U3A takes one on a fascinating journey around the world beginning in Africa and ending in Australia. Slides 39 to 52 of the Powerpoint program are self explanatory about the Quarantine Station in Sydney.

The Story of the Snowy Mountains Scheme

The Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Scheme is the largest engineering project ever undertaken in Australia. The system’s construction is seen by many as a defining point in Australia’s history, and an important symbol of Australia’s identity as an independent, multicultural and resourceful country. Thanks to Mel Davies for this excellent resource which can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Climate Change

The text of two addresses delivered to the 2009 U3A Network-NSW Conference

  • Understanding Climate Change – Colin Jones
  • Carbon and Climate Change – Don Saville

Can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Your Cosmic Connections

This 45 minute entertaining educational session by Anthony Bayes is very comprehensive with a voice-over on the disk. It includes the Big Bang theory, excellent images of planets, stars and their relative sizes and the table of elements. Astronomy enthusiasts will enjoy this session.

THE BIG BANG – How the Universe Began

The Big Bang is a PowerPoint Presentation of 84 slides by Parry Jones from Kiama U3A. It is an invaluable resource for any teacher/student of Science. The slides are excellent and will need some extra knowledge of Astronomy as there are no notes included.

Visions, Dreams and Hypnosis

This PowerPoint program is divided into three parts for presentation over a 2 hour session. First presented as a part of Magic and Myths, this resource deals with what is real and unreal and lets the audience make up their own mind.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2

Murray-Darling Basin

Almost the whole of inland South-Eastern Australia is part of the Murray-Darling Basin. It covers an area 1,450 kilometres long and 1,000 kilometres wide and consists largely of plains rising to the Great Dividing Range on its Eastern and Southern rim.

So begins this series of presentations about the Murray-Darling Basin by Pam McGlynn from Tuggerah Lakes U3A. Using PowerPoint presentations and excellent quicktime audios and movies Pam has provided a comprehensive resource telling the history, the effect that water use has had on the environment, water trading and funding and a host of other concerns.

Available in PowerPoint.

Architecture – Weird and Wonderful

So many buildings could be included in this resource. The choices here are totally random. This fun session will take you on an interesting journey and one full of contrasts.

Available in PowerPoint and can be downloaded from Expanded Catalogue 2.

Cryptic Crosswords

There are 10 Crossword tutorials ranging through from easy to difficult. Throughout the series, there are hints and examples to explore with a solution to each crossword that includes explanations of each answer. These can be done either individually or in groups. Anyone could be a tutor for these fun activities.

Arthur Maynard’s Sudoku Puzzles

This material is presented in PDF format to facilitate download and printing. The course consists of 8 lessons or modules. Students should ignore previous knowledge of Sudoku to get most value from lessons 1 and 2. Most puzzles up to Very Hard can be solved with these techniques

Arthur Maynard’s Cryptics for Absolute Beginners

There are 5 crosswords with tutorials and solutions which Arthur Maynard of Warwick (QLD) U3A invites us to try out. These are for absolute beginners and would be excellent to use along with the Cryptic Crosswords already on file. As well as these first 5 sessions, there are now 13 more puzzles with solutions. The latter can be downloaded from Arthur’s Cryptic for Novices 6 to 18.

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